Saturday, 12 February 2011

Eating Seagull. (or KFSeagull...)


Vermin with wings? Chicken of the sea? Or just an opportunity missed?


First and foremost, before we all go on a mad seagull killing frenzy. In the U.K it is against the law to kill seagulls or interfere with their nests under the countryside and wildlife act. Some Councils are allowed to cull them however, and usually do this by either poisoning or shooting them.

How to catch your seagull. Remember this is against the law in the U.K. I don't want the Men in Blue knocking at the door because someone said that Foodimum told them it was okay to catch and eat seagulls. It isn't...

Put some bait on a hook on a fishing line. Fling the bait up in to the air so that the seagull goes for it and reel it in. Break its neck as you would a chicken.

Someone also tried an interesting technique here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWuyKPGxhFo

I haven't tried any of the recipes below but if you do live somewhere where catching seagulls is legal and you have a go please let me know!

Seagull Recipe 1: Sautéed Seagull

(adapted from http://everything2.com/title/Dutch+Seagull+Recipe):

Pluck and prepare the seagull as you would a chicken and joint or quarter.

Soak the meat in heavily briny water in a cold place (the fridge?)for 12 hours. This is to try and remove the fishy taste. Do this again at least 3 times, each time throwing away the old salty water and replacing it with fresh briny water.

Lightly sauté the meat in butter, onions, lots of garlic and herbs and then add stock. Simmer for 3 hours. After 3 hours throw the liquid away. A voilà.

Recipe 2: Fricassee of Seagull

(Inspired by the cookbook "Cooking by Marguerite" (1999, published by Benedict Jacob))

Boil the seagull carcass for 2 hours in lightly salted water. Mince the flesh, and add to a hot pan of sesame oil, sliced beetroot, beansprouts, white wine or cider vinegar and vermouth. Serve with raisins or melon.

I would imagine that this would be a rather intense experience with hot oil sizzling and perhaps the vermouth igniting.

Recipe 3:KF Seagull

I found references to Seagulls being referred to as 'Sea going chickens' in the Channels Isles and that inspired this recipe.

I think that as with rooks the younger birds would be more succulent and if I had a choice I would like to feed the young seagull squab on oatmeal and cooked vegetables for a bit before dispatching it. I also think that you would need more than one bird to make a decent meal.

INGREDIENTS:
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon basil
1/2 teaspoon thyme
1/2 teaspoon oregano
1 teaspoon ground ginger
2 teaspoons garlic salt
1 tablespoon celery salt
1 tablespoon black pepper
1 tablespoon dry mustard
4 tablespoons paprika
2 cups plain flour
Dried breadcrumbs
2 eggs
Diced Seagull
Vegetable oil

Preheat your oven to 190 degrees Celsius.

Place everything in a bowl except the breadcrumbs, eggs, diced seagull and oil. Dip the meat into the beaten egg then the breadcrumbs then the herby floury mix.

Place all your pieces on an oven tray and cover with foil. Cook for 30 min’s then uncover and cook for another 30 min’s uncovered. Baste with the oil and cook for 5 more minutes. Allow to stand and serve.

As I say, I haven't tried any of the recipes so the timings might be out....

Well, I think the challenge is complete. I wonder if any of the recipes work......? If I find a way of legally obtaining a seagull I'll let you know.

4 comments:

David said...

Jade,
Why on earth would you describe gulls as 'vermin'? What a bizarre concept!
Otherwise an entertaining blog!
David

About Jade...... said...

I do agree with you David and I don't think they are vermin.I suppose I'm referring to many (usually tabloid )newspaper articles or the notes from meetings about gull culls where people describe them as such and I think many people perceive them as such. But yes... they are technically not vermin and yes that would be a bizarre concept! Thanks for reading the blog and for your great comment. Jade

petau said...

This sunday it's gull on a barbie, mmmh!

Anonymous said...

Western trash dumps and landfills are filled with gulls who dine the rotting garbage in the U.S.

They are like flying rats aka scavengers.

http://www.pestcontrol-products.com/gull.htm