Saturday, 17 July 2010

I ate a squirrel and I liked it......



So, Jason, my other half was driving along one of the many country lanes we have in beautiful West Dorset, when the car coming towards him knocked down a squirrel. He stopped and as the squirrel was most definitely dead and not at all squashed (technical term:) he brought it home to me where we enjoyed squirrel legs as a delightful nibble with a glass of dandelion wine. If I get a squirrel again I think spicy peanut satay is the way to go. ...
The squirrel was very fresh and I started skinning it as I would a rabbit. As I was doing so I realised that the back legs were where the meat was and as I was in a rush I concentrated on those.
I flash fried the back legs in olive oil and garlic, then seasoned with salt and pepper. Not adventurous I know, but I wanted to get an idea of the flavour of the meat. The legs tasted like fatty free range chicken. Not bad at all and if I get another opportunity in the near future I think squirrels a goer. It’s a bit fiddly for not much meat but if you like to explore new wild food and like a bit of meat then it’s worth it. Hey and frankly it good protein for free. Just make sure,that if you do acquire a squirrel then you know what enviroment it's been living in. A squirrel from an inner city park that had been feasting from the bins would proabbly taste revolting.
P.SI've heard rumours that certain Chefs in the New Forest have squirrel in their menu. And in deepest darkest suburban Surrey my in-laws have bought it from their local butchers for the princely sum of £5! Squirrel’s on the up!

7 comments:

Alice Y. said...

I think we need to get you over here to do a workshop with the Food Project. We need recipes for squirrel :)

Don't know if you have any good recipes for Himlayan Balsam? I have heard its edible but want some good recipes to recommend.

Horst in Bridport said...

How to cook a seagull?

About Jade...... said...

I've been told that seagull has a firm meaty texture but tastes fishy. I know people used to eat gull eggs and there are rumours that seagull is to be found in kebabs and reformed meat......Totnes seems to have a bit of a tradition of eating herring gulls.

See:http://www.totnes-bsac.co.uk/misc/gulls.html.

Totnes has a secret legacy of sea bird dishes. Over the centuries, this secluded area of South Devon has come up with a number of ways of cooking the herring gull (Larus argentatus). Despite the unfashionable idea of eating sea gulls, the thrill of eating one of the many superb delicacies on offer still tempts the seabird connoisseur. Traditional dishes such as gull pie, marinated gull and mint, smoked gull souffle and roast gull have been extended by inventive offerings such as chillied gull with ginger, gull veronique and gull mousse through to the offbeat "lashings of larus". However, despite its bulky size, the gull is largely composed of feathers. One gull doesn't go very far. It is not a chicken - or a turkey. Serious gull cuisine needs considerable numbers of birds with which to prepare the dish.

I've not tried one but if I had a chance I'd be willing as long as I know that it had eaten a natural diet and wasn't full of chips.

About Jade...... said...

Now I know that Totnes has a little secret Seagull eating club....I think I may have to investigate further...

About Jade...... said...

I'd love to do a workshop for the Food Project.Please contact me when you're ready. I'll also blog some recipes for Himalayan Balsam very soon. I love it's other names: Kiss me on the mountain, Touch me not and Policemans helmet Its such very versatile plant. I wonder if it's possible to make a whole meal out of it? You can use the seeds to make a coffee substitute so it maybe possible. Blog post coming up asap!

Alice Y. said...

Brilliant :) I knew I could count on you.

Food Project workshop: maybe a date in late April/early May so we can rogue Balsam out and then have a feast?

About Jade...... said...

http://bridport-horst.blogspot.com/ see my new post with seagull recipes and everyfing.

http://foodiemumontheroad.blogspot.com/2011/02/eating-seagull-or-kfseagull.html